Snyder Hall – Part 2

Line drawing of the Health Research Institute Building from 1961.Note: Part 1 focused on Laurence Hasbrouck Snyder (1901-1986), sixth president of the University of Hawai‘i (from 1958 to 1963) and also an internationally known geneticist.  Designed by architects Takashi Anbe (1925-1985) and George K. C. Lee (1921-1995) and completed in 1962, the building that was eventually named after Snyder was built of reinforced concrete at a cost of $1.5 million. It is considered an excellent example of Tropical Modern architecture[1].

A group of people with picks and shovels at the July 1961 groundbreaking ceremony for the Health Research Institute Building

Snyder and others at the July 1961 groundbreaking for the Health Research Institute Building (later Snyder Hall). Masao Miyamoto photograph collection, University Archives.

Originally known as the Health Research Institute Building, the five-story, 60,000-square foot Snyder Hall is an excellent example of Tropical Modern architecture on campus; its operable metal louvers span the exterior, interrupted by vertical concrete columns and simple metal rails. The entrance features an elegant cascading staircase and landing—protected by a generous concrete and sheet metal canopy[2].

Over half of the University’s buildings were constructed during the period from 1960-1982. Between the years of 1959 to 1962, the old McCarthy Road—named after the Territorial Governor Charles McCarthy—was transformed into a pedestrian mall lined with monkeypod trees that helped to soften the harsh lines of structures along the mall. Four buildings—Webster, Spaulding, Edmondson, and Snyder Halls—formed what was designated as the “Memorial Quadrangle” in honor of those who had given their lives in the various wars of the 20th century[3]

Two men standing in front of the new commemorative plaque at the Snyder Hall renaming dedication ceremony in March 1968. The man on the right (with lei) is Laurence Snyder.

Laurence H. Snyder (right) at the dedication ceremony for the renamed Snyder Hall, March 1968. Masao Miyamoto photograph collection, University Archives.

In 1963 the Zoology Department moved from Gartley to Snyder Hall, which also housed the Microbiology Department and the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, parts of the John A. Burns School of Medicine[4].  It would be several years later before the laboratory rats were moved to the fifth floor of Snyder Hall, which housed Lab Animal Services[5].  Many recall the plaintive cries of other laboratory animals emitting from the fifth floor, including monkeys and roosters during the second half of the 20th century.

In 2015 Dr. Marguerite Butler, Associate Professor of Biology at UHM, supported the strategic thinking of the System-Level Integrated Academic & Facilities plan resolution but expressed concern over the lack of consultation with faculty regarding Snyder Hall and the unmet needs of the biology department to the Board of Regents[6].

The same year The Worst of Mānoa: Snyder and Kuykendall Hall was produced, revealing the degradation of the building.

The following year a steam leak filled the hallways of the second floor, renewing the call for renovation.  Two of the pharmaceutical cold rooms were broken at the time and despite passing the annual inspection on March 9, 1995, students and staff reported chemical fume hoods were not ventilating properly, compounded by falling ceiling tiles[7].

Inadequate facilities in Snyder Hall was cited as one of the reasons against the establishment of U.S. Navyʻs University Affiliated Research Center in 2006. Microbiology professors estimated that roughly 30% of all research conducted needed to be redone because of contamination from the building.

Line drawing of the Health Research Institute Building from 1961.

Line drawing of the Health Research Institute Building (later Snyder Hall), 1961. Masao Miyamoto photograph collection, University Archives.

References:

[1] MXD_MOD: Modern Architecture in a multicultural context. DOCOMOMO US National Symposium 2019 Hawaii

[2] Tropical Modernism – UH SOA Higo and Irene Shen Gallery, 2019

[3] Science & Technology Department of Hamilton Library: History and Recollections, Wermager et al., 2017

[4] Hawaii Medical Journal July 1994 v 53 n7

[5] History of the Department of Psychology at the Univerity of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Haynes and Weaver 2007

[6] September 17, 2015 Board of Regents minutes

[7] “Snyder Hall steam leak raises concerns” Ka Leo o Hawaiʻi May 4, 2015.

A Woman in the House

The Hawaiʻi Congressional Papers Collection celebrates the publication this month of former Congresswoman Pat Saiki’s memoir A Woman in the House. Saiki, who was born and raised in Hilo, was first elected to Congress in 1986, becoming the first Republican since statehood to represent Hawaiʻi in the U.S. House.

1986 Saiki for Congress bumper sticker. Patricia F. Saiki Papers, Hawaiʻi Congressional Papers Collection, University Archives & Manuscripts Department, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Library.
1986 Saiki for Congress bumper sticker. Patricia F. Saiki Papers, Hawaiʻi Congressional Papers Collection, University Archives & Manuscripts Department, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Library.

By the time she went to Congress, Saiki had worked as a teacher, been a delegate to the 1968 state constitutional convention, and served for 14 years in the state legislature, where she authored the Equal Rights Amendment to Hawaiʻiʻs state constitution, as well as a package of equal rights bills that would, for example, enable women to take out credit cards and mortgages in their own names, and make a wife’s adoption of her husband’s name upon marriage optional instead of mandatory.

Saiki helped to reorganize and rebuild the Hawaiʻi Republican Party following sweeping losses in the 1982 election. As chair of the party, she oversaw a three-fold increase in party membership and a major fundraising effort. During the next election, Honolulu voted for a Republican mayor (Frank Fasi, who had changed parties), and Hawaiʻi voted to re-elect president Ronald Reagan. 

“Republican decision-makers [in Washington] must become more clearly aware of Hawaii’s interests and its posture in the Pacific,” she told political scientist and Honolulu Advertiser columnist Daniel Tuttle in March 1986. Indeed, as a Republican, Saiki was able to gain critical Congressional and Presidential support for initiatives backed by Democratic members of the Hawaiʻi delegation, such as obtaining redress for Japanese Americans interned during WWII and stopping the bombing of Kahoʻolawe.

After serving 2 terms in the House, Saiki ran for U.S. Senate in 1990, but was defeated by Daniel Akaka. President George H. W. Bush appointed her administrator of the Small Business Administration in April 1991. Saiki again chaired the Hawaiʻi GOP in 2014.

Pat Saiki being sworn in as administrator of the Small Business Administration by Justice Sandra Day OʻConnor. Saikiʻs son Stanley Jr. holds the bible, and President George H. W. Bush looks on. April 10, 1991. Photo: Marty La Vor.  Patricia F. Saiki Papers, Hawaiʻi Congressional Papers Collection, University Archives & Manuscripts Department, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Library.
Pat Saiki being sworn in as administrator of the Small Business Administration by Justice Sandra Day OʻConnor. Saikiʻs son Stanley Jr. holds the bible, and President George H. W. Bush looks on. April 10, 1991. Photo: Marty La Vor. Patricia F. Saiki Papers, Hawaiʻi Congressional Papers Collection, University Archives & Manuscripts Department, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Library.

The Patricia F. Saiki Papers, measuring approximately 18.5 linear feet, consist of a few items from Saikiʻs service in the state legislature, but most are from her terms in the U.S. Congress and the Small Business Administration. Saiki donated a large collection of newspaper clippings about her activities and interests dating from 1968 through 1990, including many documenting her successful and unsuccessful campaigns for public office. There are also a few memorabilia items, and a small collection of photographs taken throughout her career.

More information about Congresswoman Saiki, including a link to the collection’s finding aid, can be found on the Hawaiʻi Congressional Papers Collectionʻs website. A number of photographs from the collection have been digitized and are available in the Hawaiʻi Congressional Papers Collectionʻs digital image collection.

Order A Woman in the House from patsaiki.com. Congresswoman Saiki was recently interviewed on Hawaiʻi Public Radioʻs the Conversation. Find her interview here.

References

History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives. “SAIKI, Patricia.” https://history.house.gov/People/Listing/S/SAIKI,-Patricia-(S000014)/

Tuttle, Dan. “GOPʻs Saiki: Surprise in ʻ86?” The Honolulu Advertiser. March 3, 1986.

Snyder Hall – Part 1

Image of  the newly-built Health Research Institute, which was later renamed Snyder Hall
Note: Part 2 continues with more of the history of Snyder Hall
 
The impending demolition of Snyder Hall provides an opportunity to offer an account of the sixth UH President, Laurence Hasbrouck Snyder (1958 – 1963), for whom the building–originally named the Health Research Institute Building upon its completion in 1962–was renamed in 1967. Its construction cost of $1,507,025 was met partly by federal funds and it was designed by architects Takashi Anbe and George K. C. Lee, who also designed Webster and Spalding Halls.

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Images from the Hawai‘i Congressional Papers Collection

Many of the inquiries received by the Hawai‘i Congressional Papers Collection over the years are requests for images–images of Hawai‘i’s members of Congress by themselves, images of them together as a delegation, images of them with VIPs, campaign images, and images of historical events. To better connect researchers with HCPC images, we are happy to share a small collection of images from the Hawai‘i Congressional Papers Collection.

Senator Hiram Fong in the snow in front of the Capitol, March 21, 1967. Senator Hiram L. Fong Papers, Hawai‘i Congressional Papers Collection, University Archives & Manuscripts Department, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Library

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In Appreciation of Campaign Volunteers

“This will not be a tea party. It will be a tough, hard fight and none of us can afford to let down for a minute.”

–1962 election speakers’ kit, Senator Daniel K. Inouye Papers

We’re used to seeing candidates on debates, on the news, in commercials, on social media. What’s a lot less visible is the labor of the thousands of volunteers working tirelessly behind the scenes stuffing envelopes, arranging speaking engagements and coffee hours, phone banking, canvassing, coordinating fundraisers, and registering voters. From silk screening T-shirts to repairing torn banners, every contribution matters. “No matter how you spend your day, you can do something to help Sparky!” reported the August 26, 1964, edition of Sparky Re-election Campaign News (Senator Spark M. Matsunaga Papers).

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An Invitation to Celebrate: the 1979 Establishment of Asian Pacific American Heritage Week

Flyers for Asian Pacific American Heritage Week events, May 1979. Senator Daniel K. Inouye Papers. Reports of racism and xenophobia, along with the disproportionate way that COVID-19 has been impacting our communities, are bringing an increased sense of urgency to May 2020’s Asian Pacific American Heritage Month celebrations. They echo some of the reasons for establishing the original designation over 40 years ago. The now month-long event was first celebrated for just a week: the week of May 4, 1979.

Efforts to establish the first Asian Pacific American Heritage Week were coordinated by the Asian Pacific Congressional Staff Caucus and National Coalition for an Asian Pacific American Proclamation, led by Ruby G. Moy, Chief of Staff for Representative Frank Horton (R-NY), and Jeanie Jew, a Capitol Hill staff member whose grandfather, M. Y. Lee, had immigrated to the U.S. from China to help build the transcontinental railroad and was later killed in Oregon during a period of anti-Asian unrest. According to Representative Horton, this inspired Jew’s belief that “not only should Asians understand their own heritage…all Americans must know about the contributions and histories of the Asian-Pacific American experience in the United States” (Rep. Horton (NY). “Asian/Pacific-American Heritage Month,” Congressional Record 138 (4 Oct. 1992) p. 31364–access for UHM users via HeinOnline).

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New Online Exhibit – THE LUCIANO MINERBI COLLECTION: 50 years of collaborative Community Activism through Urban and Regional Planning

The UH Mānoa Archives is pleased to announce “The Luciano Minerbi Collection: ​50 years of collaborative community activism through urban and ​regional planning,” an online exhibit by LIS student intern Sharnelle Renti-Cruz.

This page replicates Sharnelle’s exhibit text and captures a few of the images she used, but please also check out the original exhibit site to see its proper formatting and additional content. Continue reading

Aloha from the new Congressional Papers Archivist!

Aloha kākou! I’m Dawn Sueoka, and I’m delighted to join the UH Mānoa Library’s Archives & Manuscripts Department as the new Congressional Papers Archivist. A little bit about me: my ancestors are originally from Japan; they settled on Kaua‘i—in Kōloa and Kapa‘a—four generations ago. I grew up in Central O‘ahu and on Kaua‘i. (And, in response to one of Hawai‘i’s most ubiquitous and revealing getting-to-know-you questions: Moanalua High School.)

My job as Congressional Papers Archivist is to collect, preserve, promote, and facilitate access to the Hawai‘i Congressional Papers Collection, which comprises the papers of members of Hawai‘i’s Congressional delegation from 1959 to the present. It includes the papers of Senators Hiram Fong, Daniel Inouye, Spark Matsunaga, and Daniel Akaka; as well as the papers of Representatives Thomas Gill, Pat Saiki, Neil Abercrombie, and Ed Case. All together, these collections measure over 4,000 linear feet–that’s almost ¾ mile of Hawai‘i’s 20th and 21st-century political history!

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CTAHR History: Wahiawa Pineapple Festival Exhibition and Recipes from the Cooperative Extension Service

Some of the oldest records in the University Archives are found in the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) collection.  Act 24 signed by Governor Carter on May 24, 1907 established the College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts of the Territory of Hawai‘i as a Land Grant college under the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890, and since then various internal and external entities have been assumed under CTAHR.

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